Wine Regions

MOROCCO    ISRAEL     FRANCE


TAKE A VIRTUAL TOUR OF THALVIN- DOMAINE OULED THALEB



Since ancient times, Morocco has been an ideal location for the planting of vineyards and bottling of wines. Over the centuries, vineyards periodically appeared and disappeared in Morocco, but the immigration of French wine-growers, plagued by phylloxera in 1880 in their native France, brought about a rebirth and expansion of Morocco's vineyards. This Moroccan wine renaissance helped transform the local wine industry where, due to the nature of Morocco's soil and climate, wine producers have enjoyed the guarantee of full ripening of their grapes, and consequently, a consistent quality to their product.


One of the best regions for making wine in Morocco is the Ouled Thaleb Estate, situated 20 miles northeast of Casablanca, which clearly demonstrates a similarity with the soil of Bordeaux and particularly, the Medoc region. The soil consists of sandy shale and gravel sand, and like the Medoc region, the estate is in close proximity to the sea. Located on the Ben-Slimane plateau, it faces the Atlantic Ocean and is swept by west winds which leave their maritime influence on the region.


Thalvin, in partnership with landowners in Rommani, a region of rolling hills situated at the base of the Atlas Mountains (at an altitude of 2000 feet), have planted vines where the black soil, its chalky clay subsoil and the emerging rock supply the very particular qualities desired for the making of quality wines. Grapes are hand picked and there is no use of herbicide or fungicide, so technically these grapes are grown organically. The wine industry in Morocco employs about 10,000 people and supplies about 40 million bottles of Moroccan wine per year!


Throughout the seasons and during the grape harvest and various stages of Moroccan wine-making, the wine-growers and the oenologist, Jacques Poulain, work alongside one another with constant regard for quality to bring the best of Thalvin "Terroirs" to your table. Moroccan wine has finally made it across the Atlantic!